Recipe #24: GINISANG SITAW AT KALABASA (Yardlong Beans & Squash Stir Fry)

It’s a rainy Sunday which I spent sleeping most of the day. Aside from the typhoon in the country that somehow signaled the end of the summer season, today is also a Mother’s Day. So, Happy Mother’s Day to my mother and to all mothers who read this blog.

On this post, I give you the second recipe of Mrs. Trinidad Cayco (which is pretty much the same recipe of lola) whom apparently celebrated her 54th wedding anniversary with her husband this week. 54 years, guys! That’s like 13 Olympic Games. So, that’s another reason for celebration. Happy Anniversary, Larry’s nanay and tatay!

Anyway, today’s recipe is Ginisang Sitaw at Kalabasa or Yardlong Beans & Squash Stir Fry. When I was younger, I was a picky eater. Vegetables are at the bottom of the list of my favorite foods. But what kid likes vegetables anyway? There are, however, some exceptions to the rule — I like sitaw and kalabasa. So here’s the recipe of my two favorite vegetables in one dish.

Ginisang Sitaw at Kalabasa

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Recipe #23: HALABOS NA HIPON

I spent my Holy Week at my best friend Larry’s house in Malabon, pretty much my second home since I moved out of the town. The Cayco residence is fortunate for having Aling Trining, Trinidad, or nanay as we fondly call her. She is actually Larry’s grandmother, and like my own lola, she also does magical things in the kitchen. The next three recipes that will be featured on this site will be by her.

Malabon and its neighboring city, Navotas, are known for its abundant fresh seafood. Since the historical times, the seafood and fish industries are still very much alive. Not to mention, small scale industries that produce the best quality fish sauce (patis), vinegar, and shrimp paste (bagoong) — some of the key ingredients of the many dishes that the sister cities are known for.

Since it was Holy Week, Larry’s nanay prepared this very quick and simple seafood dish. Halabos na Hipon is shrimp cooked in its own broth. The size of the shrimps depends on you. Of course, the bigger the size, the more expensive they are. Smaller shrimps are, in a way, preferred because the head is usually consumed too. Not one part of the shrimp is wasted. This is because removing the shell and the head will just leave you a tiny piece of meat. But then again, some people (like Larry) prefers a headless shrimp so it’s up to you if you want it removed or not. Just don’t forget to dip it in vinegar with ginger for some added zest.

Photo below was taken by Larry.

Halabos na Hipon

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Recipe #22: MINATAMIS NA MUNGGO (Sweet Red Mung Beans)

This recipe brings back a lot of childhood memories in my hometown Malabon. The friendly sorbetero (ice cream vendor) would roam around the neighborhood enticing the kids for a daily afternoon treat of everyone’s favorite cold dessert.

Dirty ice cream maybe just a dime a dozen, but there’s nothing dirty in it. And in the town where I grew up, it was served with something extra special. Ice creams are smothered in Sweet Red Mung Beans or Minatamis na Mungo — a great topping more delectable than mallows, chocolate syrup, or sprinkles.

Minatamis na Mungo is one of my family’s favorite local delicacies. Aside from being a topping for ice cream, it’s also one of the ingredients in Halo-halo, a filling or palaman in breads and hopia, or even as a partner of suman. And guess what, it can also be eaten as it is!

If you like buying Minatamis na Mungo preserves in bottles, I’m telling you now that this one tastes a hundred times better. Adding it as a topping on ice cream may not be very common in other places in the country, but I’m sure you will also enjoy this yummy treat especially during the summer season.

The recipe below is my mother’s who loves local delicacies. Enjoy!

Ice Cream with Sweet Mung Beans (Munggo)

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