Recipe #53: CRISPY KANGKONG

Crispy Kangkong

When your family eats Sinigang almost every week, chances are, there’s always an abundant supply of kangkong lying around in your fridge’s vegetable compartment. Kangkong (or water spinach) is uber cheap and it’s available all year round. A bundle of kangkong costs about P15 (US$.30) at the grocery and, perhaps, even cheaper at the public market.

Aside from Sinigang, kangkong can also be cooked as adobo, topped with some crispy garlic and savory dark sauce, which can be a fantastic side dish to your fried or grilled seafood, chicken, or pork. But today, we’re making Crispy Kangkong.

Crispy Kangkong is also a tasty appetizer, typically served in restaurants (which may sometimes cost a little more than it should be). But now, you can simply make them at home. The kangkong leaves are coated in spiced batter before frying them in hot oil. Drain the excess oil on a paper towel and that’s it, ready to be served. Easy-peasy!

Check out the complete recipe below:

Continue Reading

Recipe #52: LECHONG KAWALI

Lechong Kawali

There was a classic jest at home when I was younger whenever we asked our lola what’s for dinner—she would respond that we’re having lechong kawali, then she would hand me the kawali (lechong kawali literally means roasted wok).

Of course, lechong kawali is neither a lechon (roast) nor a kawali (wok). It is what you make at home when you’re craving for a lechon, but don’t have the time or the luxury to buy or roast an entire pig. Lechon is usually only served during special occasions.

Filipinos created lechong kawali (perhaps with Chinese influence) as an attempt to ‘imitate’ the succulence of a lechon without all the fuss. Although this simple pork belly dish is not roasted, it is cooked twice: by boiling and deep frying. Some recipes require a second deep fry to achieve that crispy pork skin. Traditionally, the pork belly is cooked in a kawali hence the name, but any deep pan can be used.

Lechong kawali is quite similar to many Asian dishes such as the Chinese Siu Yuk and the Thai Moo Grob. Personally, nothing beats our local version when it comes to flavor.

Check out the recipe below:

Continue Reading

Recipe #51: PANDESAL

Pandesal recipe

Pandesal is one of my favorite breakfast carbs, next to garlic fried rice or sinangag. Perhaps, the most popular type of bread in the Philippines, pandesal or pan de sal is a simple yeast-raised bread that, despite its name (which is Spanish for salt bread), actually tastes sweeter than salty reflecting Pinoys‘ love for sweets.

If it’s your first time to bake bread, I tell you, this pandesal recipe is fairly easy to make. In fact, pandesal was the first type of bread that I made and it came out perfectly!

Although it’s important that you religiously follow any kind of recipe in baking, this pandesal recipe is very forgiving if you made minor mistakes in the process. For example, if you added too much liquid, you can always add more flour. You can also add filling, such as cheese, corned beef, or pork giniling for a tastier treat.

Pandesal recipe

Pandesal recipe

Continue Reading
1 2 3 13