Recipe #55: CHAMPORADO

Champorado Recipe

I have a confession to make. I don’t like Champorado (sorry!). I’m not a fan of a sweet meal, especially for breakfast.

I actually don’t remember when my dislike for Champorado started. However, I do remember enjoying it as a child. My other lola (my lola‘s sister-in-law who lived next door) had a carinderia in front of her home and she used to sell breakfast meals. Early in the morning, I would buy Champorado from her (and she would sometimes give me free puto or rice cake) and that would be my breakfast before heading for school.

Champorado is chocolate rice porridge which is historically influenced by the Mexican Champurrado. It is normally served with a drizzle of evaporated or condensed milk and eaten with salty dried fish on the side, such as tuyo (herring) or dilis (anchovy).

Filipinos love the contrasting salty and sweet flavors. I understand that salty complements sweet, but personally, the fish and chocolate combination is a bit hard to swallow, literally and figuratively. So, yup, to each his own.

This recipe is inspired by my lola‘s sister-in-law’s Champorado recipe. She added peanuts (peeled, roasted, and ground into a smooth paste) to her Champorado which resulted in a much richer flavor and creamier texture. Imagine a chocnut-flavored Champorado—it’s really good.

Excited for tomorrow’s breakfast? Grab the recipe below:

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Recipe #51: PANDESAL

Pandesal recipe

Pandesal is one of my favorite breakfast carbs, next to garlic fried rice or sinangag. Perhaps, the most popular type of bread in the Philippines, pandesal or pan de sal is a simple yeast-raised bread that, despite its name (which is Spanish for salt bread), actually tastes sweeter than salty reflecting Pinoys‘ love for sweets.

If it’s your first time to bake bread, I tell you, this pandesal recipe is fairly easy to make. In fact, pandesal was the first type of bread that I made and it came out perfectly!

Although it’s important that you religiously follow any kind of recipe in baking, this pandesal recipe is very forgiving if you made minor mistakes in the process. For example, if you added too much liquid, you can always add more flour. You can also add filling, such as cheese, corned beef, or pork giniling for a tastier treat.

Pandesal recipe

Pandesal recipe

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Recipe #37: ADOBO FLAKES

For our first recipe this year, I decided to share one of my favorite dishes — Adobo Flakes — which is another variation of the popular adobo. This recipe and our version of Adobong Tuyo has a few similarities in flavor. Both dishes exude the distinct aroma and savory of garlic. The big difference is in the texture because Adobo Flakes is shredded.

Another interesting reason why I love this recipe is that you can turn most leftover pork and chicken meat into Adobo Flakes. Your leftover Chicken Tinola or Pork Sinigang can be instantly transformed into this adobo version without the conflicting taste in your mouth. Garlic and vinegar are strong enough to overpower other flavors. Why throw away and waste your food if there are ways to save time and money with leftover recipes like this?

Adobo Flakes can be served as toppings on rice (or fried rice) or as filling in bread. Add fried egg or salted egg and fresh sliced tomatoes on the side. Prepare it using your weekend leftover food and bring it to your school or office for lunch on Monday. You may now stop wondering how those yummy Adobo Flakes in fancy restaurants are being made.

Read on to learn how. 🙂

Adobo Flakes

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