Recipe #37: ADOBO FLAKES

For our first recipe this year, I decided to share one of my favorite dishes — Adobo Flakes — which is another variation of the popular adobo. This recipe and our version of Adobong Tuyo has a few similarities in flavor. Both dishes exude the distinct aroma and savory of garlic. The big difference is in the texture because Adobo Flakes is shredded.

Another interesting reason why I love this recipe is that you can turn most leftover pork and chicken meat into Adobo Flakes. Your leftover Chicken Tinola or Pork Sinigang can be instantly transformed into this adobo version without the conflicting taste in your mouth. Garlic and vinegar are strong enough to overpower other flavors. Why throw away and waste your food if there are ways to save time and money with leftover recipes like this?

Adobo Flakes can be served as toppings on rice (or fried rice) or as filling in bread. Add fried egg or salted egg and fresh sliced tomatoes on the side. Prepare it using your weekend leftover food and bring it to your school or office for lunch on Monday. You may now stop wondering how those yummy Adobo Flakes in fancy restaurants are being made.

Read on to learn how. 🙂

Adobo Flakes

Continue Reading

Recipe #35: PALITAW

Our old folks undeniably love our local kakanin. My mother and father, even my lola and tita when they were still alive, are huge fans of these sweet rice cakes. They come in varieties of flavor, color, shape, and texture.

In Malabon, the town where I grew up in, kakanin can be found everywhere. Go to one of our public markets and you will see a special section that sells different kinds of kakanin with names you probably have never heard of. In fact, the city is known for its delectable sapin-sapin, kutsinta, and biko elaborately served in a colorful array on a round bilao.

On this blog post, I will share to you my mother’s recipe for Palitaw. We call it dila-dila in Malabon because of its distinct shape (dila means tongue). The name palitaw was derived from how it is being prepared. Palitaw or litaw means “to appear,” or in this case, “to float,” because it starts to float in water once it’s cooked.

If you want to learn how to prepare palitaw, refer to the recipe below:

Continue Reading

Recipe #34: ASIAN CHICKEN & VEGETABLE STIR FRY

Let’s take a short break from the food events that have flooded my blog for the past weeks. It’s been a while since I posted a recipe here. But don’t worry, I will find time to post more of the events that I attended soon (I’m crossing my fingers). Writing a food blog is never easy, especially if it’s a recipe blog. It’s not like our family eats gourmet food everyday, you know. Plus the fact that I have to write the recipes and edit the pictures. I always want to make every post special so that you, the readers, would find it enjoyable every time you go to this site. But, yes, it does take time.

Anyway, for today’s recipe, let me give you one of my favorite Chinese dishes that I learned from my Tita — Stir-fried Chicken and Vegetables.

Turn your ordinary day into something really special with Stir-fried Chicken and Vegetables. Don’t feel intimidated by the list of ingredients on the recipe. This is, in fact, a quick and easy meal, which is what many Chinese dishes are known for. Your senses will be delighted with the combination of the sweetness of fresh vegetables and soothing aroma of ginger roots and soy sauce — very typical of many Asian dishes.

Stir-fried Chicken and Vegetables

Continue Reading