Recipe #33: CHICKEN TALUNAN

Warning: the story of the origin of this dish is a tad nasty, but it has to be told. In case you cannot stomach such morbidity, please skip the proceeding paragraphs and go straight to the recipe below.

Okay, you’re still reading this, so I presume you have a huge appetite for adventure or probably you just don’t really care. Either way, I congratulate you for having great tolerance and unwavering courage in discovering the truth behind the everyday food that we greedily devour. Give yourself…er…a pat on the back!

Seriously, Chicken Talunan, as the name suggests, are “supposedly” fighting cocks who have lost their battles during cockfights. Talunan is a Filipino word that literally translates to defeated or in a more demeaning term — loser. In short, the chicken meat used in preparing this dish traditionally comes from cocks who are defeated or who died because of the fight. I don’t really know how cockfights are being played, (and, personally, I’m not a supporter of the game), but I presume the losing cock would go to the winner. That is when the dish Chicken Talunan was born.

That wasn’t much of an icky introduction, was it? Actually, the same term also applies to horse meat. Yes, you read that right. But that’s another story altogether which requires a separate post.

Chicken Talunan

Anyway, the meat in our Chicken Talunan recipe did not come from the battle ring (thank god!). We bought them straight from the supermarket. The way it’s normally prepared is so easy, probably because it’s meant to be a quick meal to be served immediately during victory celebration after winning the cockfight. In other words, as a pulutan.

The way Chicken Talunan is prepared is like a combination of Adobo and Paksiw, except that it has ginger (although fish paksiw also has ginger) and the chicken meat is cooked in its own fat. Fast and easy, it is almost a one-step recipe because the ingredients are dumped in all at once.

Try it out yourself at home without learning how to cockfight. I just hope you haven’t lost your appetite yet. Here’s the recipe for Chicken Talunan:

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Recipe #32: MISUA BOLA-BOLA

Filipinos love soups. We enjoy them as they are, or we eat them with rice to add moist and texture. When I was a kid, I remember eating a bowl of rice overflowing in warm soup of Nilaga or Sinigang — types of pork, beef, or seafood stews. One of my favorite soup dishes is called Misua Bola-bola or Meat ball soup with Misua Noodles, and you can easily prepare this dish at home using today’s recipe.

Misua noodles originated from China which we inherited through its culinary influence in the country. Unlike rice vermicelli (bihon), which is made from rice, misua is made from wheat flour. These are very thin, white noodles that are very delicate, easily break when raw, and quickly absorbs liquid. You can buy them from your nearest sari-sari store (variety store), public market, or supermarket.

Misua Bola-bola

Misua Bola-bola is also known in some parts of the country as Almondigas. Because some recipes of Almondigas use rice vermicelli instead of misua, we will call it Misua Bola-bola to make a distinction. Besides, that how we call it back home in Malabon.

Perfect for rainy days, enjoy a warm bowl of Misua Bola-bola as a main dish, an appetizer, or as an afternoon snack. I still prefer the childish way by mixing it with my rice. It reminds me of the good old days.

I divided the recipe into two parts: the first one is how to prepare the meatballs; the last one is for the soup. Check the recipe below:

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Recipe #31: TUNA PESTO PASTA with Clara Olé

Before we begin cooking, let me tell you briefly what happened last Sunday.

I had the chance to portray one of my dream jobs — to be a cook show host, hah! Well, I didn’t exactly host a show. But I got the chance to prepare a sumptuous dish in front of a live audience during the Clara Ole‘s Share Eat! event in celebration of Joy of Eating at the Mercato Centrale in Bonifacio Global City, Taguig.

Clara Ole 3

Clara ole

Clara ole

I wasn’t alone during my short cooking stint though. Renowned chef and food stylist Chef Eugene Raymundo was there with me who performed cooking demos using Clara Ole products, together with Appetite Magazine‘s Editor-in-Chief Nina Daza-Puyat who introduced Clara Ole to us.

Clara Ole
Chef Eugene Raymundo

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