Recipe #37: ADOBO FLAKES

For our first recipe this year, I decided to share one of my favorite dishes — Adobo Flakes — which is another variation of the popular adobo. This recipe and our version of Adobong Tuyo has a few similarities in flavor. Both dishes exude the distinct aroma and savory of garlic. The big difference is in the texture because Adobo Flakes is shredded.

Another interesting reason why I love this recipe is that you can turn most leftover pork and chicken meat into Adobo Flakes. Your leftover Chicken Tinola or Pork Sinigang can be instantly transformed into this adobo version without the conflicting taste in your mouth. Garlic and vinegar are strong enough to overpower other flavors. Why throw away and waste your food if there are ways to save time and money with leftover recipes like this?

Adobo Flakes can be served as toppings on rice (or fried rice) or as filling in bread. Add fried egg or salted egg and fresh sliced tomatoes on the side. Prepare it using your weekend leftover food and bring it to your school or office for lunch on Monday. You may now stop wondering how those yummy Adobo Flakes in fancy restaurants are being made.

Read on to learn how. 🙂

Adobo Flakes

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Recipe #34: ASIAN CHICKEN & VEGETABLE STIR FRY

Let’s take a short break from the food events that have flooded my blog for the past weeks. It’s been a while since I posted a recipe here. But don’t worry, I will find time to post more of the events that I attended soon (I’m crossing my fingers). Writing a food blog is never easy, especially if it’s a recipe blog. It’s not like our family eats gourmet food everyday, you know. Plus the fact that I have to write the recipes and edit the pictures. I always want to make every post special so that you, the readers, would find it enjoyable every time you go to this site. But, yes, it does take time.

Anyway, for today’s recipe, let me give you one of my favorite Chinese dishes that I learned from my Tita — Stir-fried Chicken and Vegetables.

Turn your ordinary day into something really special with Stir-fried Chicken and Vegetables. Don’t feel intimidated by the list of ingredients on the recipe. This is, in fact, a quick and easy meal, which is what many Chinese dishes are known for. Your senses will be delighted with the combination of the sweetness of fresh vegetables and soothing aroma of ginger roots and soy sauce — very typical of many Asian dishes.

Stir-fried Chicken and Vegetables

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Recipe #32: MISUA BOLA-BOLA

Filipinos love soups. We enjoy them as they are, or we eat them with rice to add moist and texture. When I was a kid, I remember eating a bowl of rice overflowing in warm soup of Nilaga or Sinigang — types of pork, beef, or seafood stews. One of my favorite soup dishes is called Misua Bola-bola or Meat ball soup with Misua Noodles, and you can easily prepare this dish at home using today’s recipe.

Misua noodles originated from China which we inherited through its culinary influence in the country. Unlike rice vermicelli (bihon), which is made from rice, misua is made from wheat flour. These are very thin, white noodles that are very delicate, easily break when raw, and quickly absorbs liquid. You can buy them from your nearest sari-sari store (variety store), public market, or supermarket.

Misua Bola-bola

Misua Bola-bola is also known in some parts of the country as Almondigas. Because some recipes of Almondigas use rice vermicelli instead of misua, we will call it Misua Bola-bola to make a distinction. Besides, that how we call it back home in Malabon.

Perfect for rainy days, enjoy a warm bowl of Misua Bola-bola as a main dish, an appetizer, or as an afternoon snack. I still prefer the childish way by mixing it with my rice. It reminds me of the good old days.

I divided the recipe into two parts: the first one is how to prepare the meatballs; the last one is for the soup. Check the recipe below:

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