Blogged: Lola’s Top 3 Android Apps for Food Lovers

Eeek! My food blog was hijacked!

I’ve been freakin’ out for the past weeks because I couldn’t get into my blog’s dashboard. There was an error on my WordPress log in page, and the ignoramus in me had no idea what was causing it. I’m not exactly the best person to ask about technology and programming, you know. But thanks to my friend, Mij, who tweaked some codes on my blog to resolve the problem. And now I’m back!

Speaking of techie, and being an Android fan myself (yes, I like keeping myself updated with the latest news in tech and gadgets), I made a list of some of the best Android apps for all the techie Pinoy foodies out there — something that you may find useful when you’re out for lunch or while you’re prepping something nice for dinner.

So, ready your Android devices, open the Google Play app, and download my top 3 favorite Android apps for food lovers:

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Recipe #41: GINATAANG HALO-HALO (ALFAJOR)

Ginataang Halo-Halo is another favorite Filipino merienda or minandal which is usually served as a mid-morning or mid-afternoon snack. In my hometown, this delectable dish is popularly known as Alfajor. A warm bowl of this sweet delicacy can be enjoyed at a nearby carenderia, usually being served along side lugaw and other kakanin.

Root crops are the key ingredients of Ginataang Halo-Halo which easily fill your stomach and give you enough energy for a day’s work. Saba bananas and ripe jackfruit add an extra sweetness, and the sago and glutinous rice balls (bilo-bilo) provide a chewy texture.

Just an additional note, I personally find it challenging to prepare Ginataang Halo-Halo because I get allergic reaction while peeling taro roots (gabi). It gives me an itch that lasts for several days. Gabi is naturally toxic when raw, but its toxicity diminishes when cooked. What I do is I wear a plastic bag or hand gloves whenever I prepare the root crop. So, take extra precautionary measures as you might also experience the same discomfort.

Meanwhile, the glutinous rice (malagkit) dough is the same ingredient that we use in making Palitaw. Check out my Palitaw recipe to learn how to make the dough at home. When you shape it into small balls, it is locally known as bilo-bilo, which perhaps came from the Tagalog word bilog which means round in shape.

Just like many of Filipino dishes, Ginataang Halo-Halo can be prepared without one or two of the ingredients especially when they are not available in the place where you live. Check out Filipino stores in your area for canned varieties if you can’t find fresh produce.

Ginataang Halo-Halo

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Recipe #40: MINATAMIS NA SAGING (Kusilbang Saging)

 

On today’s recipe, we have Minatamis na Saging or Kusilbang Saging. If the word kusilba is alien to you, it’s the Tagalog word for preserves, as in fruit preserves, such as jams and marmalades.

Minatamis na Saging is mouth-watering and very easy to prepare. You will need this recipe to make Saging con Yelo. This is also one of the ingredients of our favorite Halo-halo. Personally, I like Minatamis na Saging served as it is.

Pro Tip: Make sure the saba bananas are super ripe, which means that most of the skin has already blackened. This is the best way to use saba bananas because they easily absorb the sweetness of sugar and the final product has a soft, yummy texture.

So, to make this sweet, simple, and short, check out the recipe below for Minatamis na Saging.

Minatamis na Saging / Kusilbang Saging

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