Recipe #55: CHAMPORADO

Champorado Recipe

I have a confession to make. I don’t like Champorado (sorry!). I’m not a fan of a sweet meal, especially for breakfast.

I actually don’t remember when my dislike for Champorado started. However, I do remember enjoying it as a child. My other lola (my lola‘s sister-in-law who lived next door) had a carinderia in front of her home and she used to sell breakfast meals. Early in the morning, I would buy Champorado from her (and she would sometimes give me free puto or rice cake) and that would be my breakfast before heading for school.

Champorado is chocolate rice porridge which is historically influenced by the Mexican Champurrado. It is normally served with a drizzle of evaporated or condensed milk and eaten with salty dried fish on the side, such as tuyo (herring) or dilis (anchovy).

Filipinos love the contrasting salty and sweet flavors. I understand that salty complements sweet, but personally, the fish and chocolate combination is a bit hard to swallow, literally and figuratively. So, yup, to each his own.

This recipe is inspired by my lola‘s sister-in-law’s Champorado recipe. She added peanuts (peeled, roasted, and ground into a smooth paste) to her Champorado which resulted in a much richer flavor and creamier texture. Imagine a chocnut-flavored Champorado—it’s really good.

Excited for tomorrow’s breakfast? Grab the recipe below:

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Recipe #50: MACAPUNO LECHE FLAN

It’s my 50th recipe! Wouldn’t it be awesome to celebrate it with my favorite Filipino dessert—Leche Flan! 🙂

Christmas is also a time of indulgence, and there’s probably no dessert more indulgent than the leche flan. Although it’s made from simple, everyday ingredients, I think leche flan is the most decadent local desserts, bar none. It’s simple and delicate, yet rich and addicting!

Macapuno Leche Flan

In case you’re not familiar, macapuno is a sweetened coconut preserve while leche flan (literally milk flan) is akin to crème caramel or caramel pudding which has so many versions all over the world. Interestingly, both macapuno and leche flan are key ingredients in making another popular Pinoy dessert—halo-halo. I’m topping our leche flan with sweet strings of macapuno because it adds a sweet bite to the otherwise plain flan.

In the Philippines, leche flan is typically made from egg yolks (lots of it!) and condensed milk. Either whole milk, evaporated milk, or cream is added to tone down the sweetness and boost the creaminess. It can be cooked with only three ingredients, but a few drops of vanilla extract and dayap (lime) zest can be added to enhance the flavor.

Beware, weight watchers! This dessert is practically made from sugar and milk, so just imagine its calorie content. But hey, an occasional bite or two would be fine, I suppose. 🙂

Macapuno Leche Flan

In this recipe, I replaced evaporated milk with coconut cream or kakang gata as it complements our macapuno sweets. Surprisingly, the flan itself once cooked does not have any distinct coconut taste, but its texture is so much creamier compared to using evaporated milk or regular milk.

I also cut down the number of egg yolks to six. Normally, a single batch needs about 10 to 12 egg yolks, but I think it’s a tad too much, not to mention, costly. Well, guess what, I tried it with six—no negative effect on the taste or quality!

Leche flan is normally steamed, but baking is also a popular option. I personally prefer baking as it gradually reduces the moisture content of the flan which results in a denser, firmer texture.

Of course, to make my life easier, I’m using my new Breville Smart Oven. It has user-friendly features and preset functions which any kitchen novice can follow. Plus, I don’t have to worry about overcooking because it has an auto shut-off timer.

Seriously, you must try this recipe! Watch and grab the recipe below:

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Recipe #43: BANANA TURON (Valencia)

Last Sunday, my father and I prepared the perfect merienda for the family — Banana Turon. Actually, it was my mother who asked us to cook Turon to be sold outside our house as an afternoon street snack alongside my sister’s Halo-halo. But I discovered some vanilla and ube ice creams in the freezer, so I think the family practically ate half of the Turons that we made.

Turon is a sweet roll of saba banana and jackfruit (langka) coated with caramelized sugar and enclosed in lumpia wrapper. In my native town Malabon, it is locally known as Valencia, and the Turon the we have always known has a munggo filling instead of banana. It is usually served as an afternoon snack, although some posh Filipino restaurants serve it as a dessert “a la mode” which sometimes comes with an unreasonable price tag.

Banana Turon Recipe

Most of the ingredients of Turon are actually inexpensive. Saba bananas are cheap and nutritious. You can buy jackfruit flesh in tingi (small portions). In fact, we sell one piece of Turon for only P15. However, preparation can be hard labor, especially if you’re not used to rolling and wrapping and keeping everything neat and tidy.

Before you start cooking, here’s a few notes in buying the fruit ingredients: make sure the saba bananas are ripe, possibly with black spots on the skin, soft to the touch, but not mushy; jackfruit flesh must be golden yellow and sweet smelling. Using unripe fruits may result to a gummy bite which is not very appetizing.

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