Recipe #43: BANANA TURON (Valencia)

Last Sunday, my father and I prepared the perfect merienda for the family — Banana Turon. Actually, it was my mother who asked us to cook Turon to be sold outside our house as an afternoon street snack alongside my sister’s Halo-halo. But I discovered some vanilla and ube ice creams in the freezer, so I think the family practically ate half of the Turons that we made.

Turon is a sweet roll of saba banana and jackfruit (langka) coated with caramelized sugar and enclosed in lumpia wrapper. In my native town Malabon, it is locally known as Valencia, and the Turon the we have always known has a munggo filling instead of banana. It is usually served as an afternoon snack, although some posh Filipino restaurants serve it as a dessert “a la mode” which sometimes comes with an unreasonable price tag.

Banana Turon Recipe

Most of the ingredients of Turon are actually inexpensive. Saba bananas are cheap and nutritious. You can buy jackfruit flesh in tingi (small portions). In fact, we sell one piece of Turon for only P15. However, preparation can be hard labor, especially if you’re not used to rolling and wrapping and keeping everything neat and tidy.

Before you start cooking, here’s a few notes in buying the fruit ingredients: make sure the saba bananas are ripe, possibly with black spots on the skin, soft to the touch, but not mushy; jackfruit flesh must be golden yellow and sweet smelling. Using unripe fruits may result to a gummy bite which is not very appetizing.

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Recipe #28: HOMEMADE MANGO ICE CREAM

I tried something new yesterday. I made an experiment to check if I could make a homemade ice cream without using any special equipment, such as an ice cream maker. Guess what? I never thought it would be this easy.

My mother buys fruits every now and then. This weekend, we had mangoes…lots of it. And avocados. I love mangoes and I’m sure my family does too. However, there are some instances that for some reason, we fail to consume all of them, hence, they are just put to waste. So I decided to make something out of it — a homemade mango ice cream.

Like what I said, we don’t have an ice cream maker at home. However, you can always do it manually. Mango meat is soft and none of the ingredients are hard, so it’s really easy to incorporate everything.

Mango Ice Cream

You may also want to top the ice cream with your favorite fruits. Just make sure that they’re in season. Or you may want to add caramel syrup (perfect with mangoes) just to add some extra sweetness and flavor.

Nutritious and full of yum, this homemade ice cream is surely an awesome and inexpensive way to stay healthy without sacrificing good taste. I hope you’d enjoy this recipe!

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Recipe #22: MINATAMIS NA MUNGGO (Sweet Red Mung Beans)

This recipe brings back a lot of childhood memories in my hometown Malabon. The friendly sorbetero (ice cream vendor) would roam around the neighborhood enticing the kids for a daily afternoon treat of everyone’s favorite cold dessert.

Dirty ice cream maybe just a dime a dozen, but there’s nothing dirty in it. And in the town where I grew up, it was served with something extra special. Ice creams are smothered in Sweet Red Mung Beans or Minatamis na Mungo — a great topping more delectable than mallows, chocolate syrup, or sprinkles.

Minatamis na Mungo is one of my family’s favorite local delicacies. Aside from being a topping for ice cream, it’s also one of the ingredients in Halo-halo, a filling or palaman in breads and hopia, or even as a partner of suman. And guess what, it can also be eaten as it is!

If you like buying Minatamis na Mungo preserves in bottles, I’m telling you now that this one tastes a hundred times better. Adding it as a topping on ice cream may not be very common in other places in the country, but I’m sure you will also enjoy this yummy treat especially during the summer season.

The recipe below is my mother’s who loves local delicacies. Enjoy!

Ice Cream with Sweet Mung Beans (Munggo)

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