Recipe #45: SINIGANG NA ISDA SA MISO (Fish in Tamarind & Miso Soup)

Sinigang sa Miso is to the Philippines what Seafood Tom Yum is to Thailand. A type of tamarind-based soup (although sometimes guavas or kamias are used), Sinigang is arguably second to the Adobo in the popularity hierarchy of Filipino cuisine, and probably as ubiquitous as the Chicken Tinola.

However, the countries that have more similar dishes to Sinigang are perhaps from our next-door neighbors; Malaysia’s Singgang and Indonesia’s Sayur Asem also use tamarind as a souring agent unlike Thailand’s Tom Yum which uses lime.

Sinigang na Isda sa Miso 1-2

It’s apparent that sampaloc or tamarind is a very popular ingredient in many tropical countries as a souring agent in a number of savory dishes and as candied snacks. For example, one of the key ingredients of the popular Thai stir-fried noodle dish Pad Thai is tamarind paste. In the Philippines, aside from Sinigang and tamarind candies, we also have a dish called Sinampalukang Manok which uses tamarind leaves.

Today’s Sinigang na Isda sa Miso recipe is a popular variation of this national dish which you will surely enjoy especially if you love fish. Miso, a fermented soybean paste typically associated with Japanese cuisine, is an important element of this recipe. The sourness of tamarind adds a tangy counterpoint to miso‘s umami flavor which creates an outrageously delicious soup base.

Please enjoy the recipe below:

Continue Reading

Recipe #32: MISUA BOLA-BOLA

Filipinos love soups. We enjoy them as they are, or we eat them with rice to add moist and texture. When I was a kid, I remember eating a bowl of rice overflowing in warm soup of Nilaga or Sinigang — types of pork, beef, or seafood stews. One of my favorite soup dishes is called Misua Bola-bola or Meat ball soup with Misua Noodles, and you can easily prepare this dish at home using today’s recipe.

Misua noodles originated from China which we inherited through its culinary influence in the country. Unlike rice vermicelli (bihon), which is made from rice, misua is made from wheat flour. These are very thin, white noodles that are very delicate, easily break when raw, and quickly absorbs liquid. You can buy them from your nearest sari-sari store (variety store), public market, or supermarket.

Misua Bola-bola

Misua Bola-bola is also known in some parts of the country as Almondigas. Because some recipes of Almondigas use rice vermicelli instead of misua, we will call it Misua Bola-bola to make a distinction. Besides, that how we call it back home in Malabon.

Perfect for rainy days, enjoy a warm bowl of Misua Bola-bola as a main dish, an appetizer, or as an afternoon snack. I still prefer the childish way by mixing it with my rice. It reminds me of the good old days.

I divided the recipe into two parts: the first one is how to prepare the meatballs; the last one is for the soup. Check the recipe below:

Continue Reading

Recipe #31: TUNA PESTO PASTA with Clara Olé

Before we begin cooking, let me tell you briefly what happened last Sunday.

I had the chance to portray one of my dream jobs — to be a cook show host, hah! Well, I didn’t exactly host a show. But I got the chance to prepare a sumptuous dish in front of a live audience during the Clara Ole‘s Share Eat! event in celebration of Joy of Eating at the Mercato Centrale in Bonifacio Global City, Taguig.

Clara Ole 3

Clara ole

Clara ole

I wasn’t alone during my short cooking stint though. Renowned chef and food stylist Chef Eugene Raymundo was there with me who performed cooking demos using Clara Ole products, together with Appetite Magazine‘s Editor-in-Chief Nina Daza-Puyat who introduced Clara Ole to us.

Clara Ole
Chef Eugene Raymundo

Continue Reading