Recipe #32: MISUA BOLA-BOLA

Filipinos love soups. We enjoy them as they are, or we eat them with rice to add moist and texture. When I was a kid, I remember eating a bowl of rice overflowing in warm soup of Nilaga or Sinigang — types of pork, beef, or seafood stews. One of my favorite soup dishes is called Misua Bola-bola or Meat ball soup with Misua Noodles, and you can easily prepare this dish at home using today’s recipe.

Misua noodles originated from China which we inherited through its culinary influence in the country. Unlike rice vermicelli (bihon), which is made from rice, misua is made from wheat flour. These are very thin, white noodles that are very delicate, easily break when raw, and quickly absorbs liquid. You can buy them from your nearest sari-sari store (variety store), public market, or supermarket.

Misua Bola-bola

Misua Bola-bola is also known in some parts of the country as Almondigas. Because some recipes of Almondigas use rice vermicelli instead of misua, we will call it Misua Bola-bola to make a distinction. Besides, that how we call it back home in Malabon.

Perfect for rainy days, enjoy a warm bowl of Misua Bola-bola as a main dish, an appetizer, or as an afternoon snack. I still prefer the childish way by mixing it with my rice. It reminds me of the good old days.

I divided the recipe into two parts: the first one is how to prepare the meatballs; the last one is for the soup. Check the recipe below:

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Recipe #24: GINISANG SITAW AT KALABASA (Yardlong Beans & Squash Stir Fry)

It’s a rainy Sunday which I spent sleeping most of the day. Aside from the typhoon in the country that somehow signaled the end of the summer season, today is also a Mother’s Day. So, Happy Mother’s Day to my mother and to all mothers who read this blog.

On this post, I give you the second recipe of Mrs. Trinidad Cayco (which is pretty much the same recipe of lola) whom apparently celebrated her 54th wedding anniversary with her husband this week. 54 years, guys! That’s like 13 Olympic Games. So, that’s another reason for celebration. Happy Anniversary, Larry’s nanay and tatay!

Anyway, today’s recipe is Ginisang Sitaw at Kalabasa or Yardlong Beans & Squash Stir Fry. When I was younger, I was a picky eater. Vegetables are at the bottom of the list of my favorite foods. But what kid likes vegetables anyway? There are, however, some exceptions to the rule — I like sitaw and kalabasa. So here’s the recipe of my two favorite vegetables in one dish.

Ginisang Sitaw at Kalabasa

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Recipe #23: HALABOS NA HIPON

I spent my Holy Week at my best friend Larry’s house in Malabon, pretty much my second home since I moved out of the town. The Cayco residence is fortunate for having Aling Trining, Trinidad, or nanay as we fondly call her. She is actually Larry’s grandmother, and like my own lola, she also does magical things in the kitchen. The next three recipes that will be featured on this site will be by her.

Malabon and its neighboring city, Navotas, are known for its abundant fresh seafood. Since the historical times, the seafood and fish industries are still very much alive. Not to mention, small scale industries that produce the best quality fish sauce (patis), vinegar, and shrimp paste (bagoong) — some of the key ingredients of the many dishes that the sister cities are known for.

Since it was Holy Week, Larry’s nanay prepared this very quick and simple seafood dish. Halabos na Hipon is shrimp cooked in its own broth. The size of the shrimps depends on you. Of course, the bigger the size, the more expensive they are. Smaller shrimps are, in a way, preferred because the head is usually consumed too. Not one part of the shrimp is wasted. This is because removing the shell and the head will just leave you a tiny piece of meat. But then again, some people (like Larry) prefers a headless shrimp so it’s up to you if you want it removed or not. Just don’t forget to dip it in vinegar with ginger for some added zest.

Photo below was taken by Larry.

Halabos na Hipon

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